undyingking: (Default)
Heard recently that the govt is going ahead with bringing in a subsidy for domestic solar hot water systems, whereby you get paid 18p or so per kWh of heat that you generate (as well as saving off your gas bill, of course).

It's estimated that a typical 20-tube installation on a south-facing roof will pull down somewhere around £400-500 for you per year through this subsidy: not bad.

There is a snag, though, which is that the subsidy isn't payable for installations on houses with combi boilers: only for those with the more traditional cylinder-plus-boiler setup. Not because there is any technical drawback to using solar-heated feed to a combi, or efficiency penalty, or anything like that: that's not an issue. It's simply a policy decision.

This is probably a bit galling for anyone who thought they were being nice and eco-friendly by installing a combi boiler, as previous govts persistently urged us all to do. But fair enough, maybe they are thinking that encouraging solar adaptation of older boiler systems is going to clean up more of the low-hanging carbon-emission fruit.

But this is where the title of this post comes in. It'll cost you about £3000 (say) to rip out your lovely efficient new combi boiler and replace it with a cylinder-plus-boiler system. With the subsidy guaranteed to rise with inflation for 20 years, you'd repay that and be quids in before too long.

Hmm.
undyingking: (Default)
Heard recently that the govt is going ahead with bringing in a subsidy for domestic solar hot water systems, whereby you get paid 18p or so per kWh of heat that you generate (as well as saving off your gas bill, of course).

It's estimated that a typical 20-tube installation on a south-facing roof will pull down somewhere around £400-500 for you per year through this subsidy: not bad.

There is a snag, though, which is that the subsidy isn't payable for installations on houses with combi boilers: only for those with the more traditional cylinder-plus-boiler setup. Not because there is any technical drawback to using solar-heated feed to a combi, or efficiency penalty, or anything like that: that's not an issue. It's simply a policy decision.

This is probably a bit galling for anyone who thought they were being nice and eco-friendly by installing a combi boiler, as previous govts persistently urged us all to do. But fair enough, maybe they are thinking that encouraging solar adaptation of older boiler systems is going to clean up more of the low-hanging carbon-emission fruit.

But this is where the title of this post comes in. It'll cost you about £3000 (say) to rip out your lovely efficient new combi boiler and replace it with a cylinder-plus-boiler system. With the subsidy guaranteed to rise with inflation for 20 years, you'd repay that and be quids in before too long.

Hmm.

Grey water

May. 18th, 2009 12:50 pm
undyingking: (Default)
Has anyone got experience of, or knowledge about, collecting grey water for garden use?

My current plan is to attach a water butt to the external downpipe from our shower, like the one that collects rainwater on the guttering downpipe. What do I need to consider?

For example, does gribble collect in the butt, that might need clearing out or treatment? What's the pH of the collected water going to be like? Do you need to let it stand before using it on the garden? And other such things that I haven't thought of.
undyingking: (Default)
Sorry, this is another very boring utilitarian post. Too busy to be thoughtful or creative!

Do any of you have a walk-in shower, ie. one where there aren't doors that you shut behind you, but instead you just go around a partition?

If so, do you find that you get much water sneaking its way out into the room? And would you recommend / disrecommend your particular make (of enclosure, not of shower itself)?

Edited to add: I mean this sort of thing.

Books etc

Apr. 25th, 2007 02:59 pm
undyingking: (Default)
We had the voting session for our book group at the weekend, where we decide what will be read over the next 18 months or so. It was combined with "cook group", a one-off variant in which we all brough along some food of a literary nature, rather than reading a book as normal. (My effort was a pie with the words "Life of" in pastry on the top.)

You might remember I asked you for suggestions a little while ago -- thanks to everyone, especially to [livejournal.com profile] secondhand_rick whose offering won popular approval with the group.

Bookage )

If I was a good person I'd link each of them to the appropriate Amazon page, but I'm not, so I haven't.

Etceterage )
undyingking: (Default)
This interested me:
Washington Defense of Marriage Alliance )

Curtains for the office )

Taking drastic steps )

Housey housey )
Anyway, that's probaly enough rambling, those of you who got this far without falling asleep. Have a good day!
undyingking: (Default)
Your future, Moldo-Wallachian
Sadly it looks from a quick search as though spam uses of this excellent term are outstripping "genuine" ones.

In other spams, hello to my new correspondents Hairstyles O. Electrocardiogram and Gamey H. Flanders, who have apparently sent me an e-card.

In boring house news meanwhile, we had a guy in to service our boiler today, and he's condemned it, as apparently it was venting CO into the bathroom. Good job we never breath in there eh? We were kind of expecting this as it's an old boiler which the previous owners had never had serviced at all, but we were hoping it would get us through the winter before having to lash out gosh knows how much replacing it. Ho hum.

More positively, I've repaired the stairs to the cellar (which were so rickety I managed to amusingly fall through them) and I've made a start on taking up the flooring in the conservatory, which has a nasty sag in one corner. It's not as if these are original Victorian components of the house -- that stuff is all still sturdy and fine. It's the more recent bodge jobs that are falling apart. And no doubt my own fixes will disintegrate just as quick, in a cycle of destruction that will only end when (a) the house falls down, or (b) it's bought by someone who actually has enough money to get things fixed properly.
undyingking: (Default)
I'm back online now after the house move, although only via 56K dialup at the moment -- will be another week or so until ADSL activated*.

I don't think I'm going to be able to read through the acreage of old friends' page, so if you've posted anything which I ought to know about, could you please tell me about it again here?

I won't blurge on about the house etc now, as things are still pretty hectic with redecorating and so on. Suffice to say it's all basically lovely and everything is good with us. Hope likewise with you!




* (Thanks to more BT useless-bastardry, which I won't go into here.)
undyingking: (Default)
At the new house the people currently there are on NTL, but we wanted to transfer our BT account, broadband etc from here. BT tell me that to do so will incur an installation charge of 99 quid. I point out that there are what look like perfectly good BT fixtures already in the house, and as presumably they were in use before the cable came in a few years ago, they'll probably just be able to flick a switch and reconnect them. They tell me that in that case it might be less than 99 quid, but they won't assess it and quote us -- they'll only consider it if we commit to paying the full possible 99 quid if that's what's required. And all the while of course we'll be without phone / interweb / the ability for me to work / etc.

If it wasn't that from previous experience I know NTL are at least equally annoying and useless, I'd just say "well tough luck then, we'll keep the cable". I'm sure it won't be 99 quid, but it's their attitude that really tees me off.

(Sorry, just had to vent that.)

Moving!

May. 10th, 2006 04:58 pm
undyingking: (Default)
It's all suddenly got official -- we exchanged contracts this afternoon, and we're moving house next Thursday. Yikes! Goodbye Kings Avenue, hello London Road!
undyingking: (Default)
Masking tape )

Tanzania )

Trolls )

Hove )

Pillow )
undyingking: (Default)
Preparatory to moving we need to replace some skirting-board in the living-room. I've pulled the old board off, but the nails which were holding it are still embedded firmly in the wall and I can't work out how to get them out without pulling out large chunks of wall. But they're too flush for me to get a hacksaw in and cut them off. Or should I just make hollows in the back of the new board (which I'm going to be gluing on) to accommodate their heads? They're big old rectangular-cross-section things and look like they've been there for some time...

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